Just How Healthy Is the Food You’re Eating?

 

Have you ever looked at the meal you’re about to eat and wondered, “Is this food I’m about to put in my body really healthy? What nutrients and benefits will I gain from it?”

 

The fact is that many people simply gobble up their food without knowing what they’re getting from it. For example, did you know that the fiber in apples can help absorb bad (LDL) cholesterol? Or that spinach may help you maintain vigorous brain function, memory, and mental clarity?

 

Most people are not aware of the wealth of nutrients they can get from consuming a truly healthy diet –particularly raw, high-quality, organic fruits and vegetables – that is actually one of the most crucial factors in staying optimally healthy. 

 

Dr. Joseph Mercola says  that eating a balanced diet full of whole, natural foods is still the best way to promote good health. This is backed up by traditional societies across the world eating only food sources found close to nature, and who show none of the characteristic diseases found in societies eating the standard Western diet.

 

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Click the button for Food Facts Guide

 

It is time for you to get to know your food, and to make sure you’re only consuming the best varieties. Let Dr. Joseph Mercola’s Food Facts guide you every step of the way.

 

 

 

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Toxic food is fueling epidemics of diabetes, cancer, heart disease, ill health, and environmental destruction. Join the Food Revolution Network to get insights you can trust, and support you can use, from some of the top food experts on the planet. Read more about us.

 

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What Are Pomegranates Good For?

 

Pomegranates have been enjoyed for thousands of years and are a symbol of hope and abundance in many cultures. They've been found in Egyptian tombs, eaten by Babylonian soldiers prior to battle and incorporated into Persian wedding ceremonies to symbolize a joyous future.

 

It's even been suggested that it was pomegranates, and not apples, that grew in the Garden of Eden. Pomegranate literally translates to "seeded apple," but research shows pomegranates may pack even more nutritional punch.

 

Sometimes referred to as the Chinese apple or "jewel of the winter" (in North America, pomegranates are in season during early winter), pomegranates are one of the world's most popular fruits.

In North America, they're often overshadowed by more common fruits like apples and oranges, but once you learn how to eat them (it's not as hard as you might think), this is one fruit that can add valuable nutrition, including antioxidants, to your regular diet.

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Brussels Sprouts: A Superfood with Cancer-Fighting Potential

 

 

If you’re looking for an extremely nutrient-dense food that’s also tasty and easy to prepare, look no further than Brussels sprouts.

 

This member of the cruciferous family of vegetables (along with broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, and more) was cultivated in Italy during the reign of Roman emperors and was named for the city of Brussels, Belgium, where it was first referenced in the 1200s.

 

One cup of cooked Brussels sprouts contains just 56 calories but is packed with more than 240 percent of the recommended daily amount (RDA) for vitamin K1, and nearly 130 percent of the RDA for vitamin C.

 

Plus, Brussels sprouts are a good source of fiber, manganese, potassium, choline, and B vitamins. They even contain protein. What is perhaps most exciting about Brussels sprouts, however, isn’t only their incredible array of nutrients. It’s their antioxidants and other phytochemicals, which have been proven to fight chronic diseases, including cancer.

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What Are Elderberries Good For?

 

Botanical name: Sambucus Canadensis

 

Sometimes propagated as an ornamental shrub, the elderberry bush is a member of the honeysuckle family. It's actually a small tree, with an abundance of delicate white flowers emerging as berry clusters generally between August and October, mostly in cool-to-warm areas of the country, like the Northeastern and Northwestern areas of the US and Canada.

 

A uniquely American fruit familiar to the nation's first inhabitants, traditional uses for elderberries by Indians, who made use of every little part of the plant, included tools crafted from the branches, such as arrow shafts and pipes, as well as the berries.

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