INTUITION

Intuition is often referred to as “gut feelings,” as they seem to arise fully formed from some deep part of us.

 

Corliss Lamont Quote: “The intuition of free will gives us the truth.”

 

It is our pleasure, purpose, and goal to share Connection - Holistic Lifestyle - Alternative Healing Treatments - Living Happier with New Thought - from original sources.

 

GlobalCnet is a collection of links to the original thought, research, new ideas, and found expert advice. We have assembled extensive information and facts to inspire YOU to further your education, skills, and desires on your specific subjects. When you click on a blue link, you arrive on a website, do your research, and observe all the other articles available to you.  Record what you need.  Share what you learned

 

GlobalCnet connected you, to make better-informed decisions.

 

This is a teaching and informative Web Site again, presenting original authors, like Harvard University, MedNet, Unstuck.com, Readers Digest, Mental Health, and documents from millions of Web Sites which were written, published, and illustrated with specific content to expand your knowledge for personal growth, health and answers.  All this WWW content was meant for your reading and answers,

 

GlobalCnet just connected you

 

It is our hope that you use all information for further answerers, ideas for more exploration, and the wisdom to share discoveries with others.  It is all about having the right fast or safe connections.  Everything has already been discovered, be smart, and use proven methods and spin your solutions to fit your needs. 

 

 Any questions, comments or to just say hello...leave a webmail .

Quick links to information and new ideas.  click here.

 

 

OK...you are now on GlobalCnet.  You can use the SEARCH BAR to quickly find subject information, or you can visit all the pages.  Your visit will award an organized starting point leading to answers to your challenge.......just do it.  Type in a word and hit search.

 

                                             - Michael J. Malette, PhD

                                               Founder, Global Connection Network

 

 

 

 

 

Where Intuition Comes From

 

SpeedKingz/Shutterstock

Psychologists believe that intuition relies on powers of pattern-matching, as the mind combs experience stored in long-term memory for similar situations and presents in-the-moment judgments based on them.

The automatic information processing that underlies intuition can be seen in the everyday phenomenon known as "highway hypnosis,” which occurs when a driver travels for miles without a conscious thought about the activity of driving the car.

 

Is intuition the same as gut feelings?

 

Intuition is often referred to as “gut feelings,” as they seem to arise fully formed from some deep part of us

In fact, they are the product of brain processing that automatically compares swiftly perceived elements of current experience with past experience and knowledge, and they are delivered to awareness with considerable emotional certainty.

 

How do gut feelings relate to first impressions?

 

Intuition, like first impressions, serves the brain’s need to predict and prepare for what will happen next.

First impressions are rapid, holistic assessments of people based on subtle perceptual cues and judgment of intent to help or harm.

Both rely on automatic processes and, as rapid evaluation systems, both are subject to error, especially from biases we hold.

 

When to Trust Your Gut

Anatomy Inside/Shutterstock

Our gut feelings are often correct, but we tend to attach a certainty to them that they do not always merit.

They do tend to be more accurate in some domains of experience than others, such as in the formation of first impressions.

Intuition is also often valuable in detecting deception and other forms of danger, and in detecting sexual orientation.

 

Should I trust my intuition?

 

Gut feelings do have their value in complex decision-making. Studies of top executives show that even after they analyze mounds of data, the information does not tell them what to do; that is where intuition is a guide.

People typically cite rational-seeming criteria for their actions and do not disclose the subjective preferences of feelings that arise spontaneously.

 

Is my intuition always right?

 

Experts find that intuition, no matter how right it feels, is more reliable in some areas of activity than others.

For example, it can help you generate new ideas or new figures of speech, but don’t count on it for comprehending vocabulary, where reflective thinking better fits the task, or in judging job candidates. Many situations actually utilize a combination of intentional reflective deliberation and automatic intuition.

 

Essential Reads

 

Mask-Wearing as a Cognitive Cue

Robert N. McCauley Ph.D. on March 3, 2021 in Why Religion Is Natural and Science Is Not

The vaccinated should continue to comply with public health measures for a reason beyond concerns about infectiousness and social solidarity.

 

On Intuitive Conservatives and Reflective Liberals

Onurcan Yilmaz, Ph.D., and Ozan Isler, Ph.D. on May 21, 2020 in Moral Intuitions

What is your position if you pass the second person in a race? Recent research suggests that your answer can give insights to your political ideology.

Relationship PTSD

Erin Leonard Ph.D. on October 28, 2019 in Peaceful Parenting

Your new girlfriend calls. She’s upset. You try and say the right thing. She grows quiet and ends the conversation. Panic ensues, and you are certain she's going to leave you now.

 

Leaders Should be Detectives, Not Psychics

Robert Smither Ph.D. on September 27, 2019 in The Leader’s Edge

The danger of relying on intuition.

 

When to Trust Your Gut

 

Anatomy Inside/Shutterstock

 

Our gut feelings are often correct, but we tend to attach a certainty to them that they do not always merit.

They do tend to be more accurate in some domains of experience than others, such as in the formation of first impressions.

Intuition is also often valuable in detecting deception and other forms of danger, and in detecting sexual orientation.

 

Should I trust my intuition?

 

Gut feelings do have their value in complex decision-making. Studies of top executives show that even after they analyze mounds of data, the information does not tell them what to do; that is where intuition is a guide.

People typically cite rational-seeming criteria for their actions and do not disclose the subjective preferences of feelings that arise spontaneously.

 

Is my intuition always right?

 

Experts find that intuition, no matter how right it feels, is more reliable in some areas of activity than others.

For example, it can help you generate new ideas or new figures of speech, but don’t count on it for comprehending vocabulary, where reflective thinking better fits the task, or in judging job candidates.

 

Many situations actually utilize a combination of intentional reflective deliberation and automatic intuition.

 

10 Things Highly Intuitive People Do Differently

10 Things Highly Intuitive People Do Differently

 
SYNOPSIS
 

"Pretty much everyone has experienced a gut feeling -- that unconscious reasoning that propels us to do something without telling us why or how.

But the nature of intuition has long eluded us, and has inspired centuries' worth of research and inquiry in the fields of philosophy and psychology."

 

Intuition is challenging to define, despite the huge role it plays in our everyday lives. 

Steve Jobs called it, for instance, "more powerful than intellect."

But however we put it into words, we all, well, intuitively know just what it is.

 

Pretty much everyone has experienced a gut feeling -- that unconscious reasoning that propels us to do something without telling us why or how.

But the nature of intuition has long eluded us, and has inspired centuries' worth of research and inquiry in the fields of philosophy and psychology.

 

"I define intuition as the subtle knowing without ever having any idea why you know it," Sophy Burnham, bestselling author of The Art of Intuition, tells The Huffington Post. "It's different from thinking, it's different from logic or analysis ... It's a knowing without knowing."

Our intuition is always there, whether we're aware of it or not. As HuffPost President and Editor-in-Chief Arianna Huffington puts it in her book Thrive:

 

Even when we're not at a fork in the road, wondering what to do and trying to hear that inner voice, our intuition is always there, always reading the situation, always trying to steer us the right way.

But can we hear it?

Are we paying attention?

Are we living a life that keeps the pathway to our intuition unblocked?

Feeding and nurturing our intuition, and living a life in which we can make use of its wisdom, is one key way to thrive, at work and in life.

 

Cognitive science is beginning to demystify the strong but sometimes inexplicable presence of unconscious reasoning in our lives and thought.

 

Often dismissed as unscientific because of its connections to the psychic and paranormal, intuition isn't just a bunch of hoo-ha about our "Spidey senses" -- the U.S. military is even investigating the power of intuition, which has helped troops to make quick judgments during combat that ended up saving lives.

 

"There is a growing body of anecdotal evidence, combined with solid research efforts, that suggests intuition is a critical aspect of how we humans interact with our environment and how, ultimately, we make many of our decisions," Ivy Estabrooke, a program manager at the Office of Naval Research, told the New York Times in 2012.

 

Here are 10 things that people in touch with their intuition do differently.

They listen to that inner voice.

 

"It's very easy to dismiss intuition," says Burnham. "But it's a great gift that needs to be noticed."

The No. 1 thing that distinguishes intuitive people is that they listen to, rather than ignore, the guidance of their intuitions and gut feelings.

 

"Everybody is connected to their intuition, but some people don't pay attention to it as intuition," Burnham say. "I have yet to meet a successful businessman that didn't say, 'I don't know why I did that, it was just a hunch.'"

 

In order to make our best decisions, we need a balance of intuition -- which serves to bridge the gap between instinct and reasoning -- and rational thinking, according to Francis Cholle, author of The Intuitive Compass.

 

But the cultural bias against following one's instinct or intuition often leads to disregarding our hunches -- to our own detriment.

 

"We don't have to reject scientific logic in order to benefit from instinct," says Cholle.

"We can honor and call upon all of these tools, and we can seek balance.

And by seeking this balance we will finally bring all of the resources of our brain into action."

 

They take time for solitude.

 

If you want to get in touch with your intuition, a little time alone may be the most effective way.

Just as solitude can help give rise to creative thinking, it can also help us connect to our deepest inner wisdom.

 

Intuitive people are often introverted, according to Burnham.

But whether you're an introvert or not, taking time for solitude can help you engage in deeper thought and reconnect with yourself.

 

"You have to be able to have a little bit of solitude; a little bit of silence," she says. "In the middle of craziness ... you can't recognize [intuition] above all of the noise of everyday life."

 

They create.

 

"Creativity does its best work when it functions intuitively," writes researcher and author Carla Woolf.

In fact, creative people are highly intuitive, explains Burnham, and just as you can increase your creativity through practice, you can boost your intuition. In fact, practicing one may build up the other.

 

They practice mindfulness.

 

Meditation and other mindfulness practices can be an excellent way to tap into your intuition.

As the Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute explains, "Mindfulness can help you filter out mental chatter, weigh your options objectively, tune into your intuition and ultimately make a decision that you can stand behind completely."

 

Mindfulness can also connect you to your intuition by boosting self-knowledge. A 2013 study published in the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science showed that mindfulness -- defined as "paying attention to one's current experience in a non-judgmental way" -- may help us to better understand our own personalities.

 

And as Arianna Huffington notes in Thrive, increased intuition, compassion, creativity and peace are all wonderful side effects of meditating.

 

They observe everything.

 

"The first thing to do is notice -- keep a little journal, and notice when odd things happen," Burnham says. You'll gain a keen sense for how often coincidences, surprising connections and on-the-dot intuitions occur in your daily life -- in other words, you'll start to tap into your intuition.

 

They listen to their bodies.

 

Intuitive people learn to tune into their bodies and heed their "gut feelings."

If you've ever started feeling sick to your stomach when you knew something was wrong but couldn't put your finger on what, you understand that intuitions can cause a physical sensation in the body.

 

Our gut feelings are called gut feelings for a reason -- research suggests that emotion and intuition are very much rooted in the "second brain" in the gut.

 

They connect deeply with others.

 

Mind reading may seem like the stuff of fantasy and pseudo-science, but it's actually something we do everyday.

It's called empathic accuracy, a term in psychology that refers to the "seemingly magical ability to map someone's mental terrain from their words, emotions and body language," according to Psychology Today.

 

"When you see a spider crawling up someone's leg, you feel a creepy sensation,"Marcia Reynolds writes in Psychology Today.

"Similarly, when you observe someone reach out to a friend and they are pushed away, your brain registers the sensation of rejection.

 

When you watch your team win or a couple embrace on television, you feel their emotions as if you are there. Social emotions like guilt, shame, pride, embarrassment, disgust and lust can all be experienced by watching others."

 

Tuning into your own emotions, and spending time both observing and listening to others face-to-face can help boost your powers of empathy, says Reynolds.

 

They pay attention to their dreams.

 

Burnham recommends paying attention to your dreams as a way to get in touch with your mind's unconscious thinking processes.

Both dreams and intuition spring from the unconscious, so you can begin to tap into this part of your mind by paying attention to your dreams.

"At night, when you're dreaming, you're receiving information from the unconscious or intuitive part of your brain," says Burnham. "If you're attuned to your dreams, you can get a lot of information about how to live your life."

 

They enjoy plenty of down time.

 

Few things stifle intuition as easily as constant busyness, multitasking, connectivity to digital devices and stress and burnout.

According to Huffington, we always have an intuitive sense about the people in our lives -- on a deep level, we know the good ones from the "flatterers and dissemblers" -- but we're not always awake enough to our intuition to acknowledge the difference to ourselves.

The problem is that we're simply too busy.

"We always get warnings from our heart and our intuition when they appear," she writes in Thrive. "But we are often too busy to notice."

 

They mindfully let go of negative emotions.

 

Strong emotions -- particularly negative ones -- can cloud our intuition. Many of us know that we feel out of sorts or "not ourselves" when we're upset, and it may be because we're disconnected from our intuition.

"When you are very depressed, you may find your intuition fails," says Burnham.

"When you're angry or in a heightened emotional state ... your intuition [can] fail you completely."

 

The evidence isn't just anecdotal: A 2013 study published in the journal Psychological Science showed that being in a positive mood boosted the ability to make intuitive judgments in a word game.

 

That's not to say that intuitive people never get upset -- but your intuition will fare better if you're able to mindfully accept and let go of negative emotions for the most part, rather than suppressing or dwelling on them.

 

This article originally appreared at Huffington Post.