What do you really know about Depression and Anxiety?

 

Image result for being sad pic

 

As we explore our thoughts and feelings,  we can mix up Clinical Depression with being Sad or Lonely?

 

Being happy relates to being aware.

 

It is our pleasure, purpose and goal to share Connection - Holistic Lifestyle - Alternative Healing Treatments - Living Happier with New Thought - from original sources.

 

GlobalCnet is a collection of links to original thought, research, new ideas and found expert advise. We have assembled extensive information and facts to inspire YOU to further your education, skills and desires on your specific subjects. When you click on a blue link, you arrive on a web site, do your research, and observe all the other articles available to you.  Record what you need.  Share what your learned

 

GlobalCnet  connected you, to make better informed decisions.

 

This is a teaching and informative Web Site again, presenting original authors, like Harvard University, MedNet, Unstuck.com, Readers Digest, Mental Health and documents from millions of Web Sites which were written, published and illustrated with specific content  to expand your knowledge for personal growth, health and answers.  All this WWW content was meant for your reading and answers,

 

GlobalCnet  just connected you

 

It is our hope that you use all information for further answerers, ideas for more exploration and the wisdom to share discoveries with others.  It is all about having the right fast or safe connections.  Everything has atready been discovered, be smart and use proven methods and spin your solutions to fit your needs. 

 

 Any questions, comments or to just say hello...leave a webmail .

Quick links to information and new ideas.  click here.

 

 

OK...you are now on GlobalCnet.  You can use the SEARCH BAR to quickly find subject information, or you can visit all the pages.  Your visit will award an organized starting point leading to answers to your challenge.......just do it.  Type in a word and hit search.

 

                                             - Michael J. Malette, PhD

                                               Founder, Global Connection Network, Inc. 

 

 

 

 

 

How to tell the difference between feeling sad and being depressed.

 

They're both valid experiences, but they're very different.

How to tell the difference between feeling sad and being depressed

 
Depression is one of the most commonly experienced mental illnesses, with recent statistics indicating that more than 3 in every 100 people suffer from it in the UK. But despite the frequency with which it occurs, it can be difficult for some people to tell whether they're actually suffering from a bout of depression, or if they're just experiencing a phase of sadness.
 
Sadness is an emotion that must not be dismissed, but it is not the same as being depressed. So how can you tell the two apart? We asked Dr Mark Winwood, Director of Psychological Services for AXA PPP healthcare, to explain exactly how to differentiate between the two. With this kind of information, you can determine whether what you're experiencing is something you should seek support from your GP for.
 
"Depression is one of the commonly occurring mental health problems, characterised by a constant feeling of sadness, and is very different from temporarily feeling low," Dr Winwood told Cosmopolitan UK.
 
"People living with depression often experience intense feelings of guilt, low self-esteem and poor energy and concentration, all of which can have a severe impact on day-to-day life. While many of those who experience depression believe they are alone in their symptoms, in reality this is not the case."
 
Young woman writing diary in bed
 
When you feel sad, it can give you a bleak overall outlook on many areas of your life, however if you're depressed, you will experience a number of the symptoms listed below. But as Dr Winwood points out: "Everyone that lives with depression experiences a different combination of symptoms".
 

The symptoms can be broken down into three categories - thoughts and feelings, physical symptoms, and behaviours:

 

Thoughts and feelings

  • Lack of self-confidence and self-esteem
  • Sudden forgetfulness, concentration issues and/or indecisiveness
  • Negative thinking
  • View of life as pointless
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Constant sense of guilt
  • Sense of worthlessness
  • Helplessness
  • Low sex drive
  • Easily agitated and/or irritated
  • Numbness
  • Unable to relate with others / feeling misunderstood
  • Consistently feel low
  • Isolation
  • Numb or empty
  • No interest in usual hobbies

Behaviour

  • Detachment from others
  • Difficulty talking to people
  • Cry regularly
  • Avoiding usually enjoyable activities or social events
  • Self-harm
  • Sleeping or eating much more or less than usual
  • Increasing alcohol, tobacco or drug intake

Physical symptoms

  • Sudden increase or loss of appetite
  • Loss of sex drive and lack of interest in sex
  • Lack of energy
  • Increased feeling of aches and pains
  • Constipation
  • Disturbed sleep patterns
  • Menstrual cycle changes in women

You don't have to experience all of these symptoms to classify yourself as depressed. In fact, the reality it far from it.

 

"If you feel like you're experiencing four or more of these symptoms daily for more than two weeks, it is likely you are living with depressed mood and I would recommend you visit your GP to

discuss the symptoms further," advised the doctor.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

20 JOURNAL PROMPTS

FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

 

  1. List 20 things that make you smile.
  2. Write about what you love about life.
  3. When things seem tough, I want to remember _________
  4. What is something that you have overcome?
  5. Write about some of the kindest things that you can do for yourself when you are in pain (physical and/or emotional).
  6. Write about your victories this week.
  7. What do you think your life would be like if you didn't have anxiety or depression?
  8. What positive changes have you made or experienced in the past year?
  9. Write the words that you need to hear.
  10. What does your best day look like?
  11. What would you like to be remembered for?
  12. Write about one thing that you look forward to every day.
  13. Build a list of 15 songs that can help change your mood.
  14. Write about five of your best talents.
  15. List three things that you would do if you weren't afraid.
  16. What are five things that help you feel better when things are difficult?
  17. Write about ten things that you are thankful for.
  18. What is your favorite memory?
  19. Choose one thing that triggers anxiety or depression, and then write about a few ways that you can combat this trigger.
  20. Write about something that you forgive yourself for.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

Seven Quick Fixes to Feel Better

by Madisyn Taylor

Anxiety and fear dissipate quickly when countered with conscious breathing.

The signals our bodies use to tell us we need to cleanse ourselves physically, mentally, and emotionally are multifaceted and often mirror symptoms we associate with illness. If we heed these signs, we not only feel better quickly but also stave off poor health before it can start. These quick fixes for common ailments can get you started.

1. Applying pressure to the acupressure point between the thumb and forefinger can release blockages causing pain, tension, and fatigue. You can relieve a headache naturally by squeezing for 20 seconds and releasing for 10 seconds, without letting go, four times.

2. To breathe freely, irrigate your nasal passages with a neti pot and warm salt water. As you clear and soothe the sinuses, congestion associated with allergies or infection will gradually disappear.

3. Apple cider vinegar is a powerful purifying and detoxifying agent. Soaking for 20 minutes in a warm bath infused with two cups of apple cider vinegar pulls toxins from the body and can clear blocked energy.

4. The foods you eat can have a profound impact on your outlook and mood. Eating a small yet satisfying meal rich in complex carbohydrates can lift your spirit and help you let go of feelings of anger, irritability, and depression.

5. Anxiety and fear dissipate quickly when countered with conscious breathing because concentrating on the breath enables you to refocus your attention inward. You can ground yourself and regain your usual calm by taking a series of deep belly breaths as you visualize your feet growing roots that stretch miles down into the earth.

6. Though tuning out can seem counterproductive, a few minutes spent lost in daydreams or listening to soothing music can help you see your circumstances from a new angle when you feel frustrated.

7. If you feel ill health coming on, brew a wellness elixir. Simmer three sliced lemons, one teaspoon freshly grated ginger, one clove freshly minced garlic, and one quarter teaspoon cayenne pepper in five cups water until the lemons are soft and pale. Strain a portion into a mug and add honey by tablespoons until you can tolerate the taste. Drinking this potent mixture of antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal ingredients three times each day can ensure your symptoms never progress into a full-blown illness.

 

 

 

 

→ Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean:


 

Featured Video

 

Stuart Eisendrath, MD, introduces his book WHEN ANTIDEPRESSANTS AREN'T ENOUGH: Harnessing the Power of Mindfulness to Alleviate Depression

 

   

Taming Monkey Mind in Meditation

by Madisyn Taylor

We all have the endless chatter and noise in our head, often referred to as the monkey mind.

It's been called the monkey mind – the endless chattering in your head as you jump in your mind from thought to thought while you daydream, analyze your relationships, or worry over the future. Eventually, you start to feel like your thoughts are spinning in circles and you're left totally confused.

One way to tame this wild creature in your head is through meditation – although the paradox is that when you clear your mind for meditation you actually invite the monkey in your mind to play. This is when you are given the opportunity to tame this mental beast by moving beyond thought – to become aware of a thought rather than thinking a thought. The difference is subtle, but significant. When you are aware of your thoughts, you can let your thoughts rise and float away without letting them pull you in different directions. Being able to concentrate is one of the tools that allows you to slow down your thought process and focus on observing your thoughts.

To develop your concentration, you may want to start by focusing on the breath while you meditate. Whenever your monkey mind starts acting up, observe your thoughts and then return your focus to your breath. Some breathing meditations call on you to focus on the rise and fall of the breath through the abdomen, while others have you concentrate on the sound of the breath. Fire can also be mesmerizing, and focusing on a candle flame is another useful tool for harnessing the mind. Keep the gaze soft and unfocused while observing the color, shape, and movement of the flame, and try not to blink.

 

Close your eyes when you feel the need and continue watching the flame in your head. Chanting, devotional singing, and mantras also still the mind. However you choose to tame the monkey mind, do so with firm kindness. The next time the chattering arises, notice it and then allow it to go away. With practice, your monkey mind will become quiet and so will you.

 

 

Walking through Your Fear

by Madisyn Taylor

Frequently, in walking through our fear, we discover that the strength of our fright was out of sync with reality.

The situations, activities, and individuals that frighten us remain static. Their relative intensity does not change. Fear, on the other hand, self-magnifies. It is when you are afraid and envisioning all that might go wrong that the energy underlying your fear grows. A tiny flicker of anxiety can easily develop into a terror that manifests itself physically and eventually paralyzes you into inaction. Though frequently, in walking through that fear, we discover that the strength of our fright was out of synch with reality. And we learn that doing what frightens us can lead to great blessings. Confronting your trepidation head-on will help you accept that few frightening scenarios will ever live up to the negative disasters that we sometimes play out in our minds.

Though fear is literally an evolutionary gift meant to sharpen your senses and energize you during times of great stress, it can nonetheless become a barrier that prevents you from fulfilling your potential by causing you to miss out on rewarding, life-changing experiences. During the period before you face your fear, you may have to deal with a barrage of negative thoughts and emotions. Walking through it, whether your fear is public speaking, taking part in an activity that makes you nervous, or asserting yourself when the odds are against you, may be equally as difficult. But once you have emerged unscathed on the other side, which you will, you will likely wonder why you assumed the worst in the first place. As you spend time worrying about what might happen, it's good to know that your fear probably won't happen at all. It may feel like a great weight has been lifted from your shoulders, and you will likely feel a sense of passionate pride. Walking through your fear can mean taking risks and can require both practice and patience. Since it is challenging to act when you are gripped with fear, start small.

Each step you take into fear will strengthen you and help you confront future fears with poise, courage, and confidence. You will also find that when you are willing to stare your fear in the face, the universe will always offer you some form of aid or support. When you see the heights of accomplishment and personal evolution you can attain when you walk through your fears, your faith in yourself will grow, allowing your next step to be easier.

"How living my life on the internet impacted my mental health"

YouTuber Lucy Wood opens up about the link between social media and personal wellbeing.

 
YouTuber Lucy Wood opens up about the link between social media and personal wellbeing
YouTube/LucyWood
 

"I started making YouTube videos in the summer of 2013. I'd just finished uni and was in that classic 'I don't know what the hell I'm doing with my life' phase -

 

I basically needed something to do. It was a bit of fun at the time, before YouTube was a big marketable thing; before anyone was famous because of it. People made content because they wanted to share what they bought, talk about their favourite lipsticks, do a Primark haul.

I'd lived my life on the Internet before this anyway, but it was over the following three or four years when my subscriber count grew significantly, that I noticed the relationship between my mental health and YouTube change.  Read  more....

 

 

OPINION: Being high-functioning and depressed doesn’t mean you’re not suffering

 

Writing this article, I knew it would be difficult for me to get the words out. I wanted to talk about depression generally enough so others could relate, but also specifically enough for it to matter.

I knew the topic of being extroverted and depressed would be hard to put into words.

Sometimes you get depressed because of events that happen in your life. You just can’t process through everything and your mind just can’t handle it.

 

Other times, you wake up and you can’t get out of bed for no reason. There’s no reason to be sad in your life; you go to college, you have friends and a nice family, but you just feel sad and lonely. You just sit there and you can’t focus on anything because your mind won’t cooperate.

The latter is what it’s like for me. I have two jobs and friends, and staying busy keeps my mind from running.  Read more....

 

 

Expert Insights for Women on Treating Depression (also great for men )

Psychiatrist Peter D. Kramer Discusses Help for Mood Disorder Symptoms
 

Ever been depressed and felt you should be able to recover without help or, worse, that you were born to suffer?

 

In this Lifescript exclusive, depression expert Peter D. Kramer, M.D., shares how treatments have evolved, some surprising causes and what patients need to know about getting help.  read more.......

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

When Isolation Is Ok

by Madisyn Taylor

         Sometimes we need to be alone, to simply do             nothing but enjoy the sound of silence.

We all need time alone. Even those of us who are social butterflies need some time to ourselves. Solitude is necessary for meditation and quiet reflection. We also may choose to isolate ourselves when we are busy and need to meet a deadline. We may cherish time alone when we want to give ourselves over to art or music, lose ourselves in a good book, or delve into a personal project. Having time to ourselves allows us to focus completely on our yoga practice or get into the zone while running or strength training. Sometimes we need to be alone to simply do nothing but enjoy the sound of silence. Our alone time revitalizes and replenishes us, grounding us in our own company.

Yet, too much isolation, especially when our intention is to hide, withdraw, or not deal with the realities of our lives is not physically, mentally, or spiritually healthy. It is during moments like these when being in isolation takes us away from our lives, rather than enhancing it. If anything, too much isolation can create a buffer whereby we don't have to deal with our problems. Sometimes, pushing ourselves to deal with our issues and be in our lives, rather than isolate, is one of the best gifts we can give to ourselves.

Also, just as it is important for us to have our "alone" time, we need to remember that as human beings, we are by nature social creatures that thrive on human contact. Our lives cannot occur in a vacuum, and we cannot fully live in this world without interacting with others. Consider using isolation as time spent for rest, reinvigoration, and personal growth. Isolation can then not only empower you, but it can allow you to return to your work and your relationships restored and ready for life.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

6 ways to support someone who’s having a panic attack

 

by: Mia Arderne

 

What’s the best way to respond when someone tells you they are having a panic attack or feeling severely anxious? There are many forms of anxiety disorder, including generalised anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, panic disorder, social phobia and PTSD. While social phobia is characterised by the ‘intense fear of humiliation in social settings’, panic disorder is often linked to a sudden and unpredictable feeling of terror.

 

Some common features of anxiety disorders are panic attacks or episodes, and the avoidance or fear of specific places or situations (crowds, or driving, or taking public transport). Panic attacks usually last for four to six minutes and can include a racing heartbeat, dizziness, nausea, numbness, trembling, sweating, chills or hot flushes, difficulty breathing, a sense of unreality and chest pains. According to SADAG, ‘Women are affected twice as frequently as men’ – more great news about being a woman today.

 

Here are a few suggestions for how to support a friend or loved one when they’re going through an episode or attack:

 

1. Curb the ‘What If?’ thoughts by helping them to focus on the present

The feeling of fear is disproportionate to the actual situation. You can help bring the the person going through the attack back into the present by encouraging them to focus on manageable tasks, for example, naming the objects or colours around them, or counting backwards from 100 in threes.

 

2. Confront it by naming or labelling the experience

 

Call it what it is (anxiety, a panic attack) and don’t wish the attack away. Accept it and encourage your friend to give it time to pass. SADAG suggests asking your friend to rate the feeling of fear or anxiety from zero to 10. Then encourage them to keep track of how it fluctuates and notice that it will not stay at the highest level for too long. Remind your friend that they will be okay – it’s an attack and it’s going to pass.

 

3. Ask and affirm, don’t assume

 

Ask the person what they need right now, and ask what you can do. They may be able to guide you and, for example, ask for help getting out of the building or for help with a specific need. Don’t make assumptions. It can sometimes help to affirm or support them with words of encouragement, or just affirmation – ‘we’ll stay here as long as you need to’ – depending on the person. You can also affirm them by acknowledging small victories; things that may seem unremarkable but are a huge deal for someone with an anxiety disorder, like making it to the shops. It’s important to commend small steps and not enable avoidance.

 

 

4. Don’t dictate or be dismissive

 

You can encourage breathing slowly, but don’t dismiss what is happening by saying things like ‘just relax’ or ‘calm down’. If they could, they would. Don’t say disparaging things like ‘you’re just being irrational’ or ‘you have to do x’ – that will likely make it worse. Be patient.

 

5. Don’t be a martyr

 

Do not panic when you see someone having a panic attack. You might understandably be concerned, but compounding it does not help. Do not sacrifice your own well-being or health to help someone with anxiety. This will cause resentment. It’s important to remain functional.

 

6. Help them to get help

 

Remember that the person may need professional help, and you can encourage them to do something about their anxiety.  Anxiety disorders may not be caused by a single condition or situation. The disorder could come about as a result of hereditary factors, brain chemistry, life experiences, or a combination of all three. It can be aggravated by certain physical or environmental triggers, so it may help to know what those are for the affected person. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and medication in severe cases are the advised treatments.

 

 

 

Depression Screener



Taking a depression-screening test is one of the quickest and easiest ways to determine whether you are experiencing symptoms of clinical depression. The depression-screening test on this site is completely anonymous and confidential.  TAKE THE TEST

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What are your unique gifts to share with the world?

Do you feel that you have to buy a lotto ticket to win?

Do you agree that we have to find our self love to transform?

Do you want to be happy?  A dumb question huh, think about it.

What did you do today that made you happy?

What did you want to do today to be even more happy?

Do you agree that "other activities" are better than sitting on the couch watching TV?

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Emphasis on a Distraction from Depression

 

Has any of this ever happened to you?

  • Maybe you have found yourself in the hospital’s ER because you thought you were having a heart attack, only to be told later it was anxiety?
  • Do you ever fear you might stop breathing because your chest feels tight and your breathing is erratic?
  • When you drive, do you fear the idea of getting stuck in traffic, on a bridge, or at a red light?
  • Do you ever feel afraid you might lose control or go insane?
  • Have you struggled with anxious, intrusive thoughts?
  • Do you ever feel uncomfortable in enclosed spaces such as supermarkets, cinemas, public transport, or even sitting at the hairdresser’s?
  • Do you fear socializing because you might get anxious and have to leave in a hurry? What will they think, right?

Chick on this link for multiple Videos...................

 

Animated Videos To End Panic Attacks and Anxiety

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Additional LINKS for more information on Depression

Listed below are links to more information on what is quickly labeled DEPRESSION.  You have to be aware of your own feelings.....no one else feels them.  Explore the WWW for answers and come up with some possible understanding of how you feel and why.  For further answers seek professional assistance.

 

NOW if you feel you are really feeling SAD, alone or other stuff, explore the links on self- love and discove your Trunp Card.  You are unique, you are important, you are perfect.

 

Let's explore some thoughts on Clinical Depression.

Dealing with and feeling Sad.

What can I do if I feel Lonely?

6 Ways to Ward Off Depression for Women....but Guy's check this out.

 

Your Trump Card: Self-Love.

How To Love Yourself In 17 Ways.

Keys to Self-Esteem and Self-Love.





How to Develop Trust through Self-Trust [self-trust]

 

What the heck is self-trust?

 

If you’re like most people, you’ve never heard of self-trust.  Because I’ve read hundreds of books on success, I’ve studied it some, but it’s not a common topic most authors or speakers cover. I recently read Stephen M.R. Covey’s book, The Speed of Trust and shared the stage with him last week in Vegas at my company’s convention. It’s amazing how little self-trust is talked about based on how powerful understanding it is for your success.

 

Let me ask you this . . . have you ever made a commitment to yourself and not followed through on it?  New Year’s resolutions spring to mind or maybe a goal that you set but never followed through on for your business, health or finances.  We’ve all done it.  Imagine if that was a promise you made to someone else.  Would you have tried harder to do what you said you were going to do?  Most would answer that with a resounding YES!

Breaking your word with yourself results in low self-trust.  It’s just that you’ve been doing it for so long that you don’t realize the damage it can cause you.  Low trust is the very definition of a bad relationship.  Are you in a bad relationship with yourself?

Why does this matter?  Because you can’t build trust with others if you don’t first trust yourself!  If you wanna know how to develop as a leader, then you must first understand how to re-gain your self-trust.

 

In Covey’s book, The Speed of Trust, he explains that self-trust is where you learn the foundational principle that allows you to build and sustain trust in all types of relationships.  That principle is credibility.  Ask yourself, “Am I credible?”, “Am I believable?”, “Am I someone people (including myself) can trust?”  If the answer is no, don’t worry. You can work on credibility and re-building it within yourself!

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“Self-trust is the first secret to success . . . the essence of heroism.”

                                                                   – Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

 

So there are 4 Cores of Credibility.  Basically, these are what make you believeable!  The first 2 deal with character; the second 2 are competence-related.  All 4 are necessary!

 

The 4 Cores of Credibility (Building Blocks of Self-Trust)

 

Core 1: Integrity – Are You Congruent?

This isn’t the same as honesty.  It’s much more than that.  Integrity is having the courage to act in alignment with your values and beliefs.  You’re actions are congruent with your values.

 

Core 2: Intent – What’s Your Agenda?

This has everything to do with your motives or agenda and the resulting behavior.  Trust grows when our motives aren’t purely self-motivated.  It grows when we serve and lead.

 

Core 3: Capabilities – Are You Relevant?

Simply put, these are the abilities you possess that inspire confidence.  This could include our talents, strengths, skills, knowledge…  It’s the means we use to produce results.  These can come from training.

 

Core 4: Results – What’s Your Track Record?

Did you do what you said you would do?  People pay attention to the promises or commitments you make and if you follow through on them.  This affects self-trust when you continually miss the goals you set for yourself, just as it affects others when you have a poor track record with them.

 

To get a better understanding of how these 4 cores work together, check out the diagram of the tree.  Credibility is a living, growing thing that should be nurtured.  Integrity exists as the roots and Results at the top.  Makes sense, right?

 

Look over these cores of credibility.  Where do you need work?  Where are you doing great and deserve a nice pat on the back?  Identify the areas you need work and get to it.  If self-trust is required to build trust with others and no relationship can exist without trust, shouldn’t this be a priority?

 

read more........................

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

Could You Be Depressed? Here is a basic quiz indicator.

Like Picasso, everyone goes through a "blue period" from time to time. But if you're depressed, you are experiencing more than just the occasional bad mood or terrible day. Depression affects 20 million people in any given year and is a serious enough disorder to compromise one's ability to function normally day to day.
Find out if you're just blue or if you might be clinically depressed.
 



Extrovert-Me! - Get the most out of life

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

GREAT LISTS TO EXPLORE:

 

SEARCH our Lirbary for ton's of additional information on change and being happier.

 

As you explored these links.......did you find an outstanding Web Site that you would like to share with others.  It is all about connection. Drop us a web email from the Contact Page.

 

Links from readers of this Web Site:

 

Dr. Phil.com - A great source for information.  Sent to p

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

 

20 JOURNAL PROMPTS

FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Copied from Cblue82 on PatietsLikeMe blog

 

  1. List 20 things that make you smile.
  2. Write about what you love about life.
  3. When things seem tough, I want to remember _________
  4. What is something that you have overcome?
  5. Write about some of the kindest things that you can do for yourself when you are in pain (physical and/or emotional).
  6. Write about your victories this week.
  7. What do you think your life would be like if you didn't have anxiety or depression?
  8. What positive changes have you made or experienced in the past year?
  9. Write the words that you need to hear.
  10. What does your best day look like?
  11. What would you like to be remembered for?
  12. Write about one thing that you look forward to every day.
  13. Build a list of 15 songs that can help change your mood.
  14. Write about five of your best talents.
  15. List three things that you would do if you weren't afraid.
  16. What are five things that help you feel better when things are difficult?
  17. Write about ten things that you are thankful for.
  18. What is your favorite memory?
  19. Choose one thing that triggers anxiety or depression, and then write about a few ways that you can combat this trigger.
  20. Write about something that you forgive yourself for.

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

6 ways to support someone who’s having a panic attack

 

by: Mia Arderne

 

What’s the best way to respond when someone tells you they are having a panic attack or feeling severely anxious? There are many forms of anxiety disorder, including generalised anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, panic disorder, social phobia and PTSD. While social phobia is characterised by the ‘intense fear of humiliation in social settings’, panic disorder is often linked to a sudden and unpredictable feeling of terror.

 

Some common features of anxiety disorders are panic attacks or episodes, and the avoidance or fear of specific places or situations (crowds, or driving, or taking public transport). Panic attacks usually last for four to six minutes and can include a racing heartbeat, dizziness, nausea, numbness, trembling, sweating, chills or hot flushes, difficulty breathing, a sense of unreality and chest pains. According to SADAG, ‘Women are affected twice as frequently as men’ – more great news about being a woman today.

 

Here are a few suggestions for how to support a friend or loved one when they’re going through an episode or attack:

 

1. Curb the ‘What If?’ thoughts by helping them to focus on the present

The feeling of fear is disproportionate to the actual situation. You can help bring the the person going through the attack back into the present by encouraging them to focus on manageable tasks, for example, naming the objects or colours around them, or counting backwards from 100 in threes.

 

2. Confront it by naming or labelling the experience

 

Call it what it is (anxiety, a panic attack) and don’t wish the attack away. Accept it and encourage your friend to give it time to pass. SADAG suggests asking your friend to rate the feeling of fear or anxiety from zero to 10. Then encourage them to keep track of how it fluctuates and notice that it will not stay at the highest level for too long. Remind your friend that they will be okay – it’s an attack and it’s going to pass.

 

3. Ask and affirm, don’t assume

 

Ask the person what they need right now, and ask what you can do. They may be able to guide you and, for example, ask for help getting out of the building or for help with a specific need. Don’t make assumptions. It can sometimes help to affirm or support them with words of encouragement, or just affirmation – ‘we’ll stay here as long as you need to’ – depending on the person. You can also affirm them by acknowledging small victories; things that may seem unremarkable but are a huge deal for someone with an anxiety disorder, like making it to the shops. It’s important to commend small steps and not enable avoidance.

 

 

4. Don’t dictate or be dismissive

 

You can encourage breathing slowly, but don’t dismiss what is happening by saying things like ‘just relax’ or ‘calm down’. If they could, they would. Don’t say disparaging things like ‘you’re just being irrational’ or ‘you have to do x’ – that will likely make it worse. Be patient.

 

5. Don’t be a martyr

 

Do not panic when you see someone having a panic attack. You might understandably be concerned, but compounding it does not help. Do not sacrifice your own well-being or health to help someone with anxiety. This will cause resentment. It’s important to remain functional.

 

6. Help them to get help

 

Remember that the person may need professional help, and you can encourage them to do something about their anxiety.  Anxiety disorders may not be caused by a single condition or situation. The disorder could come about as a result of hereditary factors, brain chemistry, life experiences, or a combination of all three. It can be aggravated by certain physical or environmental triggers, so it may help to know what those are for the affected person. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and medication in severe cases are the advised treatments.

 

 

 

Depression Screener



Taking a depression-screening test is one of the quickest and easiest ways to determine whether you are experiencing symptoms of clinical depression. The depression-screening test on this site is completely anonymous and confidential.  TAKE THE TEST

 

The 10 Depression Tools

These proven tools can help you feel stronger and more hopeful. Check out each page for specific, easy-to-follow tips.

  1. Connect with others
  2. Stay positive
  3. Get physically active
  4. Help others
  5. Get enough sleep
  6. Create joy and satisfaction
  7. Eat well
  8. Take care of your spirit
  9. Deal better with hard times
  10. Get professional help if you need it

 

 

Many people handle what they feel is depress in different ways.  There is research on alternatives to medication and sitting at home.  Here are a video's to inspire you:

 

Click "right on top of the Video" to contact Justin for more information.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

  In defining the Highly Sensitive Person, Dr. Aron provides examples of characteristic behaviors, and these are reflected in the questions she typically asks patients or interview subjects:

  • Are you easily overwhelmed by such things as bright lights, strong smells, coarse fabrics, or sirens nearby?
  • Do you get rattled when you have a lot to do in a short amount of time?
  • Do you make a point of avoiding violent movies and TV shows?
  • Do you need to withdraw during busy days, into bed or a darkened room or some other place where you can have privacy and relief from the situation?
  • Do you make it a high priority to arrange your life to avoid upsetting or overwhelming situations?
  • Do you notice or enjoy delicate or fine scents, tastes, sounds, or works of art?
  • Do you have a rich and complex inner life?
  • When you were a child, did your parents or teachers see you as sensitive or shy?

 

          Read more at the HSP website

 

          Are You Highly Sensitive?  Take A Self-Test



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Feeling depressed, anxious or sad? Here are 7 tips to make yourself happy right now...

Feeling depressed, anxious or sad? Here are 7 tips to make yourself happy right now... it's less than 5 minutes, but watch it only if you believe it can work (if you're skeptical or not in the mood, this will make you throw-up in your throat a little and we don't want that).

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

What are your unique gifts to share with the world?

Do you feel that you have to buy a lotto ticket to win?

Do you agree that we have to find our self love to transform?

Do you want to be happy?  A dumb question huh, think about it.

What did you do today that made you happy?

What did you want to do today to be even more happy?

Do you agree that "other activities" are better than sitting on the couch watching TV?

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Emphasis on a Distraction from Depression

 
Click on this pictures for more informatiom.....

Has any of this ever happened to you?

  • Maybe you have found yourself in the hospital’s ER because you thought you were having a heart attack, only to be told later it was anxiety?
  • Do you ever fear you might stop breathing because your chest feels tight and your breathing is erratic?
  • When you drive, do you fear the idea of getting stuck in traffic, on a bridge, or at a red light?
  • Do you ever feel afraid you might lose control or go insane?
  • Have you struggled with anxious, intrusive thoughts?
  • Do you ever feel uncomfortable in enclosed spaces such as supermarkets, cinemas, public transport, or even sitting at the hairdresser’s?
  • Do you fear socializing because you might get anxious and have to leave in a hurry? What will they think, right?

Chick on this link for multiple Videos...................

 

Animated Videos To End Panic Attacks and Anxiety

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Additional LINKS for more information on Depression

Listed below are links to more information on what is quickly labeled DEPRESSION.  You have to be aware of your own feelings.....no one else feels them.  Explore the WWW for answers and come up with some possible understanding of how you feel and why.  For further answers seek professional assistance.

 

NOW if you feel you are really feeling SAD, alone or other stuff, explore the links on self- love and discove your Trunp Card.  You are unique, you are important, you are perfect.

 

Let's explore some thoughts on Clinical Depression.

Dealing with and feeling Sad.

What can I do if I feel Lonely?

6 Ways to Ward Off Depression for Women....but Guy's check this out.

 

Your Trump Card: Self-Love.

How To Love Yourself In 17 Ways.

Keys to Self-Esteem and Self-Love.





How to Develop Trust through Self-Trust [self-trust]

 

What the heck is self-trust?

 

If you’re like most people, you’ve never heard of self-trust.  Because I’ve read hundreds of books on success, I’ve studied it some, but it’s not a common topic most authors or speakers cover. I recently read Stephen M.R. Covey’s book, The Speed of Trust and shared the stage with him last week in Vegas at my company’s convention. It’s amazing how little self-trust is talked about based on how powerful understanding it is for your success.

 

Let me ask you this . . . have you ever made a commitment to yourself and not followed through on it?  New Year’s resolutions spring to mind or maybe a goal that you set but never followed through on for your business, health or finances.  We’ve all done it.  Imagine if that was a promise you made to someone else.  Would you have tried harder to do what you said you were going to do?  Most would answer that with a resounding YES!

Breaking your word with yourself results in low self-trust.  It’s just that you’ve been doing it for so long that you don’t realize the damage it can cause you.  Low trust is the very definition of a bad relationship.  Are you in a bad relationship with yourself?

Why does this matter?  Because you can’t build trust with others if you don’t first trust yourself!  If you wanna know how to develop as a leader, then you must first understand how to re-gain your self-trust.

 

In Covey’s book, The Speed of Trust, he explains that self-trust is where you learn the foundational principle that allows you to build and sustain trust in all types of relationships.  That principle is credibility.  Ask yourself, “Am I credible?”, “Am I believable?”, “Am I someone people (including myself) can trust?”  If the answer is no, don’t worry. You can work on credibility and re-building it within yourself!

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“Self-trust is the first secret to success . . . the essence of heroism.”

                                                                   – Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

 

So there are 4 Cores of Credibility.  Basically, these are what make you believeable!  The first 2 deal with character; the second 2 are competence-related.  All 4 are necessary!

 

The 4 Cores of Credibility (Building Blocks of Self-Trust)

 

Core 1: Integrity – Are You Congruent?

This isn’t the same as honesty.  It’s much more than that.  Integrity is having the courage to act in alignment with your values and beliefs.  You’re actions are congruent with your values.

 

Core 2: Intent – What’s Your Agenda?

This has everything to do with your motives or agenda and the resulting behavior.  Trust grows when our motives aren’t purely self-motivated.  It grows when we serve and lead.

 

Core 3: Capabilities – Are You Relevant?

Simply put, these are the abilities you possess that inspire confidence.  This could include our talents, strengths, skills, knowledge…  It’s the means we use to produce results.  These can come from training.

 

Core 4: Results – What’s Your Track Record?

Did you do what you said you would do?  People pay attention to the promises or commitments you make and if you follow through on them.  This affects self-trust when you continually miss the goals you set for yourself, just as it affects others when you have a poor track record with them.

 

To get a better understanding of how these 4 cores work together, check out the diagram of the tree.  Credibility is a living, growing thing that should be nurtured.  Integrity exists as the roots and Results at the top.  Makes sense, right?

 

Look over these cores of credibility.  Where do you need work?  Where are you doing great and deserve a nice pat on the back?  Identify the areas you need work and get to it.  If self-trust is required to build trust with others and no relationship can exist without trust, shouldn’t this be a priority?

 

read more........................

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

Could You Be Depressed? Here is a basic quiz indicator.

Like Picasso, everyone goes through a "blue period" from time to time. But if you're depressed, you are experiencing more than just the occasional bad mood or terrible day. Depression affects 20 million people in any given year and is a serious enough disorder to compromise one's ability to function normally day to day.
Find out if you're just blue or if you might be clinically depressed.
 



Extrovert-Me! - Get the most out of life

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 






SEARCH our Lirbary for ton's of additional information on change and being happier.

 

As you explored these links.......did you find an outstanding Web Site that you would like to share with others.  It is all about connection. Drop us a web email from the Contact Page.

 

Links from readers of this Web Site:

 

Dr. Phil.com - A great source for information.  Sent to post on site by Steve.

 

 

 

 

Expert Insights for Women on Treating Depression (also great for men )

Psychiatrist Peter D. Kramer Discusses Help for Mood Disorder Symptoms
 

Ever been depressed and felt you should be able to recover without help or, worse, that you were born to suffer?

 

In this Lifescript exclusive, depression expert Peter D. Kramer, M.D., shares how treatments have evolved, some surprising causes and what patients need to know about getting help.  read more.......

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Overcoming Depression with Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT)

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

6 ways to support someone who’s having a panic attack

 

by: Mia Arderne

 

What’s the best way to respond when someone tells you they are having a panic attack or feeling severely anxious? There are many forms of anxiety disorder, including generalised anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, panic disorder, social phobia and PTSD. While social phobia is characterised by the ‘intense fear of humiliation in social settings’, panic disorder is often linked to a sudden and unpredictable feeling of terror.

 

Some common features of anxiety disorders are panic attacks or episodes, and the avoidance or fear of specific places or situations (crowds, or driving, or taking public transport). Panic attacks usually last for four to six minutes and can include a racing heartbeat, dizziness, nausea, numbness, trembling, sweating, chills or hot flushes, difficulty breathing, a sense of unreality and chest pains. According to SADAG, ‘Women are affected twice as frequently as men’ – more great news about being a woman today.

 

Here are a few suggestions for how to support a friend or loved one when they’re going through an episode or attack:

 

1. Curb the ‘What If?’ thoughts by helping them to focus on the present

The feeling of fear is disproportionate to the actual situation. You can help bring the the person going through the attack back into the present by encouraging them to focus on manageable tasks, for example, naming the objects or colours around them, or counting backwards from 100 in threes.

 

2. Confront it by naming or labelling the experience

 

Call it what it is (anxiety, a panic attack) and don’t wish the attack away. Accept it and encourage your friend to give it time to pass. SADAG suggests asking your friend to rate the feeling of fear or anxiety from zero to 10. Then encourage them to keep track of how it fluctuates and notice that it will not stay at the highest level for too long. Remind your friend that they will be okay – it’s an attack and it’s going to pass.

 

3. Ask and affirm, don’t assume

 

Ask the person what they need right now, and ask what you can do. They may be able to guide you and, for example, ask for help getting out of the building or for help with a specific need. Don’t make assumptions. It can sometimes help to affirm or support them with words of encouragement, or just affirmation – ‘we’ll stay here as long as you need to’ – depending on the person. You can also affirm them by acknowledging small victories; things that may seem unremarkable but are a huge deal for someone with an anxiety disorder, like making it to the shops. It’s important to commend small steps and not enable avoidance.

 

 

4. Don’t dictate or be dismissive

 

You can encourage breathing slowly, but don’t dismiss what is happening by saying things like ‘just relax’ or ‘calm down’. If they could, they would. Don’t say disparaging things like ‘you’re just being irrational’ or ‘you have to do x’ – that will likely make it worse. Be patient.

 

5. Don’t be a martyr

 

Do not panic when you see someone having a panic attack. You might understandably be concerned, but compounding it does not help. Do not sacrifice your own well-being or health to help someone with anxiety. This will cause resentment. It’s important to remain functional.

 

6. Help them to get help

 

Remember that the person may need professional help, and you can encourage them to do something about their anxiety.  Anxiety disorders may not be caused by a single condition or situation. The disorder could come about as a result of hereditary factors, brain chemistry, life experiences, or a combination of all three. It can be aggravated by certain physical or environmental triggers, so it may help to know what those are for the affected person. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and medication in severe cases are the advised treatments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depression Screener



Taking a depression-screening test is one of the quickest and easiest ways to determine whether you are experiencing symptoms of clinical depression. The depression-screening test on this site is completely anonymous and confidential.  TAKE THE TEST

How to Develop Trust through Self-Trust [self-trust]

When Isolation Is Ok

by Madisyn Taylor

         Sometimes we need to be alone, to simply do             nothing but enjoy the sound of silence.

We all need time alone. Even those of us who are social butterflies need some time to ourselves. Solitude is necessary for meditation and quiet reflection. We also may choose to isolate ourselves when we are busy and need to meet a deadline. We may cherish time alone when we want to give ourselves over to art or music, lose ourselves in a good book, or delve into a personal project. Having time to ourselves allows us to focus completely on our yoga practice or get into the zone while running or strength training. Sometimes we need to be alone to simply do nothing but enjoy the sound of silence. Our alone time revitalizes and replenishes us, grounding us in our own company.

Yet, too much isolation, especially when our intention is to hide, withdraw, or not deal with the realities of our lives is not physically, mentally, or spiritually healthy. It is during moments like these when being in isolation takes us away from our lives, rather than enhancing it. If anything, too much isolation can create a buffer whereby we don't have to deal with our problems. Sometimes, pushing ourselves to deal with our issues and be in our lives, rather than isolate, is one of the best gifts we can give to ourselves.

Also, just as it is important for us to have our "alone" time, we need to remember that as human beings, we are by nature social creatures that thrive on human contact. Our lives cannot occur in a vacuum, and we cannot fully live in this world without interacting with others. Consider using isolation as time spent for rest, reinvigoration, and personal growth. Isolation can then not only empower you, but it can allow you to return to your work and your relationships restored and ready for life.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What the heck is self-trust?

 

If you’re like most people, you’ve never heard of self-trust.  Because I’ve read hundreds of books on success, I’ve studied it some, but it’s not a common topic most authors or speakers cover. I recently read Stephen M.R. Covey’s book, The Speed of Trust and shared the stage with him last week in Vegas at my company’s convention. It’s amazing how little self-trust is talked about based on how powerful understanding it is for your success.

 

Let me ask you this . . . have you ever made a commitment to yourself and not followed through on it?  New Year’s resolutions spring to mind or maybe a goal that you set but never followed through on for your business, health or finances.  We’ve all done it.  Imagine if that was a promise you made to someone else.  Would you have tried harder to do what you said you were going to do?  Most would answer that with a resounding YES!

Breaking your word with yourself results in low self-trust.  It’s just that you’ve been doing it for so long that you don’t realize the damage it can cause you.  Low trust is the very definition of a bad relationship.  Are you in a bad relationship with yourself?

Why does this matter?  Because you can’t build trust with others if you don’t first trust yourself!  If you wanna know how to develop as a leader, then you must first understand how to re-gain your self-trust.

 

In Covey’s book, The Speed of Trust, he explains that self-trust is where you learn the foundational principle that allows you to build and sustain trust in all types of relationships.  That principle is credibility.  Ask yourself, “Am I credible?”, “Am I believable?”, “Am I someone people (including myself) can trust?”  If the answer is no, don’t worry. You can work on credibility and re-building it within yourself!

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“Self-trust is the first secret to success . . . the essence of heroism.”

                                                                   – Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

 

So there are 4 Cores of Credibility.  Basically, these are what make you believeable!  The first 2 deal with character; the second 2 are competence-related.  All 4 are necessary!

 

The 4 Cores of Credibility (Building Blocks of Self-Trust)

 

Core 1: Integrity – Are You Congruent?

This isn’t the same as honesty.  It’s much more than that.  Integrity is having the courage to act in alignment with your values and beliefs.  You’re actions are congruent with your values.

 

Core 2: Intent – What’s Your Agenda?

This has everything to do with your motives or agenda and the resulting behavior.  Trust grows when our motives aren’t purely self-motivated.  It grows when we serve and lead.

 

Core 3: Capabilities – Are You Relevant?

Simply put, these are the abilities you possess that inspire confidence.  This could include our talents, strengths, skills, knowledge…  It’s the means we use to produce results.  These can come from training.

 

Core 4: Results – What’s Your Track Record?

Did you do what you said you would do?  People pay attention to the promises or commitments you make and if you follow through on them.  This affects self-trust when you continually miss the goals you set for yourself, just as it affects others when you have a poor track record with them.

 

To get a better understanding of how these 4 cores work together, check out the diagram of the tree.  Credibility is a living, growing thing that should be nurtured.  Integrity exists as the roots and Results at the top.  Makes sense, right?

 

Look over these cores of credibility.  Where do you need work?  Where are you doing great and deserve a nice pat on the back?  Identify the areas you need work and get to it.  If self-trust is required to build trust with others and no relationship can exist without trust, shouldn’t this be a priority?

 

read more........................

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Could You Be Depressed? Here is a basic quiz indicator.

Like Picasso, everyone goes through a "blue period" from time to time. But if you're depressed, you are experiencing more than just the occasional bad mood or terrible day. Depression affects 20 million people in any given year and is a serious enough disorder to compromise one's ability to function normally day to day.
Find out if you're just blue or if you might be clinically depressed.
 



Extrovert-Me! - Get the most out of life

 

 

Many people handle what they feel is depress in different ways.  There is research on alternatives to medication and sitting at home.  Here are a video's to inspire you:

Click "right on top of the Video" to contact Justin for more information.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Feeling depressed, anxious or sad? Here are 7 tips to make yourself happy right now...

Feeling depressed, anxious or sad? Here are 7 tips to make yourself happy right now... it's less than 5 minutes, but watch it only if you believe it can work (if you're skeptical or not in the mood, this will make you throw-up in your throat a little and we don't want that).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

What are your unique gifts to share with the world?

Do you feel that you have to buy a lotto ticket to win?

Do you agree that we have to find our self love to transform?

Do you want to be happy?  A dumb question huh, think about it.

What did you do today that made you happy?

What did you want to do today to be even more happy?

Do you agree that "other activities" are better than sitting on the couch watching TV?

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Emphasis on a Distraction from Depression

Chick on this link for multiple Videos...................

 

Animated Videos To End Panic Attacks and Anxiety

 

 

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Additional LINKS for more information on Depression

Listed below are links to more information on what is quickly labeled DEPRESSION.  You have to be aware of your own feelings.....no one else feels them.  Explore the WWW for answers and come up with some possible understanding of how you feel and why.  For further answers seek professional assistance.

 

NOW if you feel you are really feeling SAD, alone or other stuff, explore the links on self- love and discove your Trunp Card.  You are unique, you are important, you are perfect.

 

Let's explore some thoughts on Clinical Depression.

Dealing with and feeling Sad.

What can I do if I feel Lonely?

6 Ways to Ward Off Depression for Women....but Guy's check this out.

 

Your Trump Card: Self-Love.

How To Love Yourself In 17 Ways.

Keys to Self-Esteem and Self-Love.





SEARCH our Lirbary for ton's of additional information on change and being happier.

 

As you explored these links.......did you find an outstanding Web Site that you would like to share with others.  It is all about connection. Drop us a web email from the Contact Page.

 

Links from readers of this Web Site:

 

Dr. Phil.com - A great source for information.  Sent to post on site by Steve.